I can learn something from everyone I meet.

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Reading Swedish film director Kay Pollak’s book “No Chance Encounter: Meeting Yourself in Others” some ten years ago was one of those eye opener you get once in a while. Whenever you have any negative feelings towards someone else it’s mostly about you, Pollak says.

At first I had troubles understanding what he meant.

So that terribly annoying mom at school is not really annoying at all – it’s I who have a problem? And that far too smiling sales man is not embarrassing at all? It’s all about me?

Of course I had to do my homework! I remember so well one morning when I was waiting for the commuting train and I saw this young adult covered in tattoos. He had tattoos all over his neck and face and they were far from professionally made. One was even wrongly spelled. I became aware of my negative feeling towards him. So my first quest was to find out what I was actually feeling? I tried to be honest and realized that it was a feeling of despise. That’s shameful! You should never despise someone! So I breathed deeply and went further into this feeling of despise. Was I despising the fact that he had tattoos? No. Did I despise that they were all over his face? Maybe, but not really. That they were so ugly and badly made? Yes! Here I could feel in my body that I had hit the root of the feeling. But why did I despise that?

“It’s ugly”, I could hear myself thinking, “and you just don’t make yourself ugly!” Aha! “Why not?”, I asked myself. “Well, you just shouldn’t!”, was the agitated answer. I was actually a bit surprised about the strength in my feelings about not making yourself ugly and I started to scan my life and childhood about such situations.

When I grew up I was very tall with red hair, freckles and white eye lashes. I never felt ugly, but then I never felt cute or beautiful either. I did my best to look good, dress nicely and be as creative as possible when I was allowed to use make-up. I had always hated masquerades when you were supposed to dress like a monster or ghost or any other kind of ugly creature. I didn’t want to look worse than I did – I wanted to look a little bit better! How on earth could anyone even suggest such parties?!

So now you can also see where my deep emotions came from! The child within not being cute enough. Feeling a bit sad about this, standing there still waiting for the train, I continued the chain of thoughts and started to think about the man with the tattoos again. What he had done I would never be able to do! I wouldn’t be brave enough to go around with one fake tattoo in my face just for one day! So actually he was much braver than I … What a turn of feelings! I looked at him and smiled and thanked him in my mind for a wonderful lesson!

Since that morning I have done this exercise many times. And it’s thrilling and amazing to see how my irritation about that mom’s behavior turn into a lessons about me being afraid of making a fool of myself at the school meeting or being unsecure about my social skills in new encounters. And I can see now how every meeting is a chance to grow and develop!

3 thoughts on “I can learn something from everyone I meet.

  1. Jorgen Thelin 23 November, 2016 / 12:11

    This is a really good training, but it is also very challenging. Since I can’t escape from the author [of this blog] and also met Kay Pollak I have done the same reflections. For me personally I have meet the same challenge from time to time. Amazing reflections open up about your own values and short comings. Still practicing and falling back, but also hopefully learning.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Myles Butler 23 November, 2016 / 18:58

    Thanks for sharing this perspective. I’ve heard the whole “What you dislike in others is really what you dislike about yourself” stuff before, but I never really understood it. This made the idea a lot clearer. Now the challenge will be applying it in my daily life!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Dawn Biyashev 5 December, 2016 / 15:12

    This is my Achilles heel. I’m called to love others, not judge. But the judgment comes naturally and freely of it’s own accord. I’m working on giving grace instead of criticism (usually in my head, but I’m sure something sneaks into by body language). This is a new idea for me to see what the annoying talkative, off topic, person reflects of me. 😉

    Like

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